News for Healthier Living

Are Scientists Closer to Growing Made-to-Order Kidneys?

FRIDAY, Feb. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists who used stem cells to grow functional kidneys in rats say their research could point the way to growing new kidneys for humans.

A shortage of donor kidneys means many people with kidney failure never get a transplant. In the United States alone, 95,000 people are waiting for a new kidney.

To address shortages of donor organs, scientists are trying to find ways to grow healthy organs outside the human body.

One approach that's produced promising results is called blastocyst complementation. Blastocysts -- the clusters of cells formed several days after egg fertilization -- are taken from lab animals bred to lack specific organs.

The blastocysts are injected with stem cells from a normal animal, though not necessarily of the same species. The stem cells form the entire missing organ in the new animal. That organ can potentially be transplanted to another animal.

"We previously used blastocyst complementation to generate rat pancreas" in mice without a working pancreas, said study lead author Teppei Goto, a researcher at the National Institute for Physiological Sciences in Okazaki-shi, Japan.

"We therefore decided to investigate whether the method could be used to generate functional kidneys, which would have much greater application in regenerative medicine owing to the high donor demand," Goto said in an institute news release.

Researchers first tried to grow rat kidneys in mice but were unsuccessful. But they were able to grow mice kidneys in rats.

Corresponding author Masumi Hirabayashi, an associate professor at the institute, said the study confirms the method is viable for kidney generation.

"In the future, this approach could be used to generate human stem cell-derived organs in livestock, potentially extending the [human] life span and improving the quality of life of millions of people worldwide," Hirabayashi said.

The study was published Feb. 5 in the journal Nature Communications.

More information

The National Kidney Foundation has more on kidney transplant.

February 8, 2019
Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


April 24 2019

April 23 2019

April 22 2019

April 21 2019

April 20 2019

April 19 2019

April 18 2019

April 17 2019

April 16 2019

April 15 2019

April 14 2019

April 13 2019

April 12 2019

April 11 2019


Copyright HealthBanks, Inc. All rights reserved. | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy